Septic tank disposal systems as phosphorus sources for surface waters
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Septic tank disposal systems as phosphorus sources for surface waters by Rebecca A Jones

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Published by Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in Ada, Okla, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Septic tanks,
  • Sewage disposal,
  • Soils -- Phosphorus content

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Rebecca A. Jones and G. Fred Lee ; Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas
SeriesResearch reporting series
ContributionsLee, G. Fred, 1933-, joint author, United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development, Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory, University of Texas at Dallas. Institute for Environmental Sciences
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 62 p. :
Number of Pages62
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13601738M

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Get this from a library! Septic tank disposal systems as phosphorus sources for surface waters. [Rebecca A Jones]. Septic tank wastewater disposal systems as phosphorus sources for surface waters. November ; Authors: R.A. Jones. The James Hutton Institute was formed to create a world leading research institute for land, crops, water and the environment. Septic tanks as source of phosphorus | The James Hutton Institute Skip to navigation Skip to content.   Problems can arise when septic systems are installed into well-drained situations, especially on shorelines, where the water table is often close to the soil surface and where the separation distance of feet from the leach field to the surface water (New York State Department of Health, ) cannot be met.

septic system waste disposal. One-third of all American homes use on-site waste water treatment systems. When they are properly designed, installed and maintained, septic tanks and similar on-site disposal systems are effective from an engineering perspective, economic for home owners and friendly to the environment. 10 rows    Avoid flushing other chemicals or medications down the drain or toilet since . Systems discharging to surface waters are regulated under EPA’s Clean Water Act National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program. Disposal of sewage sludge (biosolids) and domestic septage are regulated under EPA’s sewage sludge regulation (PDF) (1 pg, K, About PDF) . wastewater system on water quality. The WEM considers site and soil characteristics such as soil depth, permeability, phosphorus sorption capacity, slope and proposed effluent management the area. If the WEM shows the effluent plume reaches a watercourse, waterbody or drainage depression or leaving the boundaries of the site, then NorBE is not.

In the Florida Keys, for example, septic systems were shown to contribute 39% nitrogen and 42% phosphorus to oceanic surface waters (US EPA ). In , the Florida Department of Health began investigations in onsite technologies for reducing the environmental impacts from septic systems. The manual is updated periodically to adapt to the dynamic and complex nature of small wastewater disposal systems; updates are cited below. Technical Guidance Manual for Individual and Subsurface Sewage Disposal Systems (Last updated: November ) Note: This is a large file. If you have difficulty downloading it, try opening it in a. A conventional gravity-flow septic system has three working parts: of the bottom of the outlet fitting. 1. The septic tank. 2. The drainfield with its replacement area. 3. The surrounding soil. The Septic Tank. The typical septic tank is a large buried rectangular or cylindrical container made of . Phosphorus (P) in onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems (hereafter referred to as septic systems) is a concern because P can impair water quality at .